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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
-- >> what happened in france is being watched closely, because europe faces us see us strikes as governments bareback cherished benefits. bbc news, paris. >> the spanish prime minister and has called on a basket separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. -- of basque separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. mozambique has reversed its decision to raise bread prices by 30%. food riots last week left 13 dead. bread will now be sold at its previous price of 14 cents. every year since 1998, more than 30,000 japanese people have killed themselves. japan's health ministry estimates cases of suicide and depression caused the economy $32 billion last year. the government has launched a task force to address the problem. more than two weeks of political deadlock have ended in australia with confirmation that labor's julia gillard will continue as prime minister, would be backing, at last, of to independenct mp's. she has been near west possible majority. nick bryant has this. >> it is like the finale of a tv reality show, with the winner kept a closely-guarded secret until announced l
austerity measures dealing with french pension reform. welcome to bbc news. good to have you with us. we are broadcasting to our viewers in the united kingdom and around the world with me, james bagwell. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has spoken out against the plan to burn korans. general david petraeus said if it went ahead, images of the event would be used by insurgents to incite violence. coming up, we will hear what hillary clinton had to say with this report from washington. >> this is what worries general david petraeus is. 500 people in kabul, gather to demonstrate. one small church in america plans to bring copies of the koran. protesters threw rocks. >> we are concerned about the possible implications of a koran burning in the united states. it puts us in jeopardy. we have even seen trouble on just a rumor that this could take place, and i think that the images from such an activity could very well be used by extremists here and around the world in the same way that they use images from abu ghraib and some other incidents, over the years since 9/11. >> at outreach cen
sergeant olaf schmidt. >> almost a third happened here. in sangin. we join british and u.s. marines as they prepared for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons and reflect on the sacrifices that have been made. commanders were keen to show was they've achieved, how the area has proffered prospered, how much safer it's become. but this is what we saw. a long and brutal fight throughout much of the day. it doesn't happen all the time anymore, but it shows the taliban still battling coalition troops. and now america must try to finish the job britain started. no british troops were injured this time but they faced too many days like this. >> i find it very difficult to talk about actually having someone have been there, you can't describe the smells, the sights, there's no way to describe all this, even pictures don't seem to work. you have to actually be there and go through the emotions to have a true understanding of what the people here go,000. >> handing over to the americans is a bittersweet moment for the troops. they're happy to be g
to the president with a record low approval rating. >> the government is forcing us into a showdown. the only thing that can make as budget is a showdown. >> that showdown may force the government into further concessions, perhaps of face saver for the unions. two-thirds of the country are for reforms already approved by the house. it is president sarkozy who has the open hand. -- the upper hand. startednd's economy has to shrink again, despite coming out of recession earlier this year. gdp was down by 1.2% on the first quarter of the year. that contrasts with predictions it would have a small increase. the controversial diabetes drug avandia has been suspended. it has been linked to increased risk of heart failure. youtube and its owners have won a landmark piracy case brought by a spanish tv channel. each channel said its rights and violated when its videos were broadcast on youtube. the court found it was the copyright holder's responsibility to report the contents to youtube. the chairman for the international palate -- panel on climate change. it was reported that the panel contained an errone
is possible. the u.s. middle east envoy says israeli and palestinian leaders have made progress on the issue of jewish settlements. making our way down the indus river, we continue our coverage on pakistan's floods down and how the survivors are pairing. tens of thousands of mexicans celebrate their independence from spain 200 years ago. welcome to bbc news, broadcasting to our viewers in the u.k. and around the world. a senior papal adviser has pulled out of the pope's visit to the u.k. after making critical comments about the country in a magazine article. cardinal kasper said arriving at heathrow airport is like entering a third world country. he also claimed there was a new and aggressive atheism in britain. he said illness and not the interview was the reason behind his withdrawal. the pope's visit begins in scotland in a few hours time. >> colonel walter casper is a vatican insiders. he has been a senior aide to pope benedict for a decade. his role is to promote christian unity. he was part of the pope's entourage to britain. now, just hours before pope benedict's plane lands, the card
and palestinian leaders not to miss this chance for peace. as the u.s. combat mission in iraq comes to an end, the american vice-president says baghdad is close to a new government. no regrets from tony blair about his decision to send british troops to invade iraq. very warm welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers in the states on pbs and also around the globe, with me, peter dobbie. coming up later for you -- how your name and postcode can affect your chances of getting a job in france. and new pictures of the world's most famous ship wreck -- the titanic in 3-d. the u.s. president barack obama has urged israelis and palestinians not to let slip an opportunity for peace that he says may not soon return. he made the remark as he opened a landmark peace talks. our middle east editor jeremy bowen reports from washington. >> if it feels as though they have all been this way before. an american president, and israeli prime minister, launching a new attempt at middle east peace in fact -- -- these at the white house and condemning bloodshed. >> there are going to be those who do eve
is an example of what we are up against. >> benjamin netanyahu thanked the u.s. president for his efforts and described the talks says "open and productive." >> id president's statement is an expression of our -- i think the president's statement is an expression of our determination to fight and you have talks that are open, productive, and serious in the quest for peace, also centered around the need for security arrangements that are able to roll back this kind of terror and threats to security. and that is a fundamental element, an important foundation of the peace we seek, and i appreciate, mr. president, your efforts to advance this beast -- peace for us and our neighbors and, i think we can say, the world. >> mr. obama also welcomed the leaders of the palestinian and the israelis. king abdullah and other leaders will join the talks. but is there it now and new commitment to achieve peace? our correspondent reports from the west bank on what are the unresolved tensions. >> on a hill overlooking the city of jerusalem, hundreds of jewish settlers came to bury the dead. the symmetry is
small amount of a banned substance. u.s. lawmakers put pressure on china to raise the value of the wan -- yuan. welcome to "bbc world news." still to come this hour, a boost for berlusconi as his government wins the vote of confidence. the survival of his coalition remains on a knife edge. delhi is almost ready for the start of the commonwealth games, but years later. -- but fears linger. workers have taken to the streets across europe in a day of protest against the austerity measures being imposed by national governments. there have been demonstrations in greece, ireland, and latvia. tens of thousands travel to brussels to march on european union headquarters. in spain, there is a general strike. >> large crowds were on the streets in madrid this evening supporting spain's first general strike in eight years. the message repeated here and elsewhere in europe today was no to austerity. before dawn, strikers were at madrid transport depot trying to prevent buses leaving. spanish unions wanted to shut down the capital and demonstrate that the people were against spending cuts. later, co
. but the australian people told us in no uncertain terms on that day and the days that followed is this -- that we will be held more accountable than ever before. >> the election august 21 ended in deadlock. neither julia gillard nor tony abbott's liberal coalition succeeded in forming a government. the arithmetic was not balanced. yesterday, it was neck and neck. do you get right -- julia gillard had 74 seats. tony abbott had 73. first, a vote for tony abbott, giving both sides 74 seats. but then the but -- two for julia gillard. last week, the opposition leader tony abbott described himself as the head of the government in waiting. today, he was forced to concede. >> the coalition won more seats than our opponents, but sadly, we did not get the opportunity to form a government. >> there has not been a hung parliament here since the second world war. australians are used to strong and decisive government. this one looks altogether more for agile and raises the question -- how long will it last? nick bryant, bbc news, sydney. >> and six months after their election in iraq, still no government. gab
the economy, but the president with a record low approval rating. >> the government is forcing us to a showdown. the only thing that can make them budget is a showdown. >> that may force the government to make further concessions, but two-thirds of the country are resigned to reforms already approved by the lower house. with the senate vote looking to be a formality, president sarkozy has the upper hand. christian fraser, bbc news, paris. >> our economy has started to shrink again. it came out of recession earlier this year. dee dee was down by 1.2% on the first quarter of the year -- gdp was down by 1.2%. youtube and its owner, googles, have one of landmark piracy case brought by a spanish tv channel. the court ruled it was the responsibility of the copyright owner to tell googol -- google that their property appeared on the youtube. the suspension of of controversial diabetes drugcontroversialavandia. -- controversial diabetes drug, avandia. it is linked to an increased risk of heart failure. it was supposed to be a showcase moment for india, showing itself to be a global power.
-up since the revolution. the u.s. is set to announce its largest ever arms deal, $60 million worth of weapons could be heading to saudi arabia. belgium's catholic church promises help for victims of sexual abuse. they call him elle grande, one of mexico's biggest drug bosses, but now he's in jail. everybody's business. >> i won't mention the woman, but i was going to a skin doctor. i signed in. and i saw this actress' name, who i was very hot for. and i turned around and there she was. i would have seen her, though. but still, i was figuring out what i was going to say. and i went over to her and i said -- i can't say who it was. but i went and i said, i just came out. and for some reason, the doctor and i -- i blamed it all on the doctor. we have the same disease. >> did you know that? >> no. i didn't. we have the same prescription. >> was it venereal? >> no. >> but the point is, she got really upset. >> and i apologized to her when i saw her about 25 years caugh your office by somebody. >> there's always space in andy gallagher gave me more details. >> i have tried this back in
and put on planes to romania. >> today the european union used enprecedented language to rebuke one of its most powerful states >> this is a digrace. >> the commissioner said there was paralleling with world war ii >> this is a situation i would thought europe would not have to witness again after the second world war. >> enough is enough. >> the french government says the roma are actually given 300 euros each when they leave the county >> france is a proud founding member and rarely received such a dressing down and deliberately mislead the eu. part of the union's anger relates to an internal french memo when mentions dimantels roma camps a priority. some see it as targeting ethnic group. >> i am against discrimination. >> i think the french government is not totally wrong. >> it's pointed out here that other countries have removed thousands of romas without attracting such criticism. and the help hasn't been fully used. but today's comments are a huge embarrassment to an embattled president, sarkozy, now he stands as playing the tough cop. so far, he has not responded to today's atta
and they will do it. >> traditional rulers are better. they know our problems. they are dealing with us directly, so they know our problems. >> they are very careful with that. traditional rulers like to protect their personality. they tell you they will make sure. >> over the years, under both military and civilian rule, the power of these cheats and scammers has steadily been eroding. how did they continue -- the power of these chiefs and emirs has steadily been eroding. how do they continue their hold on power? >> date rule along with traditional institutions. it is not set in the media, but it is there. there are signs it will always be there and the people will always follow through on what the traditional institutions want. >> the history and culture of this place dates back centuries and little has changed in terms of tradition. i have come to meet an eim mir, granted a special audience. >> we do not order people to vote for anybody. all we do is ensure that our subjects do abide by the rule of the election. we do that to further the rule of the government. there should not be any discrim
father's successor. >> stay with us if you cannot on bbc world news. still to come -- a fifth of the world's plant species are now in danger of disappearing forever. first, she is said to be one of the most photographed people on our planet. a new exhibition of formal photographs document the life of britain's queen elizabeth in pictures. many were taken by her late sister's husband, the photographer lord snowden. >> on her right, mr. anthony armstrong jones. >> he was a society photographer who took pictures of the royals and then became one. tony armstrong jones's wedding to princess margaret was the society event of 1960. although he was not a member of the royal family, lord snowden continued to work as a professional photographer. alongside his documentary work, he was often called on to photograph the queen. many of his photographs have been included in a new exhibition, but the graphic portraits of the queen. here is an image of the monarch and her husband in the kind of formal pose you might expect, and the queen caught by a range of photographers' in less orthodox sur
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)